Haunted Railroad Tunnels inside America’s Deadliest National Park



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During tonight’s paranormal investigation, we will be visiting the Deadliest Park in America, Lake Mead.

Lake Mead is a National Park in North America home to a wide variety of recreational activities. Over Seven Million People visit the Lake annually to enjoy the history, sights, and activities Lake Mead has to offer. However, what most people do not realize is, as they enter Lake Mead, they are entering a 200,000 acre graveyard home to quite a few ghosts and haunted places.

Since the Hoover Dam was constructed in 1936, Lake Mead has been surrounded in tragedy.
By the time the Dam was constructed, 109 people had already lost their lives here. In the past ten years alone, over 275 people have passed away, making Lake Mead the deadliest national park in america. This is one of the main reasons as to why Lake Mead is a great area for Paranormal Investigations. Many ghosts/spirits still walk the grounds of Lake Mead.

One of the most popular sights Lake Mead has to offer is the unique Historic Railroad Tunnel Hike. In 1931, a 30 mile long Rail Line from Las Vegas was constructed to haul heavy equipment and materials to and from the Hoover Dam. During its construction numerous people lost their lives here from faulty explosions, carbon monoxide poisoning from the gas powered machinery, and other work related accidents. After construction of the dam was complete, the rail line was sporadically used until 1961, when the last generator was hauled down the decrepit line.

Today only 4 miles of the line remains maintained and accessible to the public. Tonight, our goal is to hike along the desolate trail, and find out for ourselves if any of the workers still haunt these tunnels..
The Reason we chose this paranormal place over others is due to the history surrounding the Hoover Dam. Numerous people died while working on it and we believe their spirits may still haunt the area.
These tunnels provided a great spot to conduct our midnight paranormal investigation since it was one of the few isolated areas near the dam.
Once we arrived at the first tunnel we immediately were able to communicate with a ghost or spirit. All of our ghost encounter was filmed on a Canon 80D camera. In the ghost video we captured the spirit moves the rods together or apart depending on its response. crossing the rods in this case meant yes while separating the rods meant no. During our spirit communication, the ghost was able to tell us he worked near or on the Haunted Railroad (railroad) we were standing on. This ghost activity left us feeling confident about our ghost hunt.

This Haunted Railroad was one of the best Paranormal places we have visited yet!

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Wall Triana Highway Railroad Crossing, Huntsville, AL



Views:3886|Rating:5.00|View Time:1:51Minutes|Likes:19|Dislikes:0
Signal on the left: 5 pairs of Modern Industries lights and a dead WCH mechanical bell.
Signal on the right: 4 pairs of Modern Industries 12×24 inch lights, 1 pair of Federal Signal 8 inch lights, and a dying Modern Industries mechanical bell.

This was the last place I caught NS A85 at.

The MI bell here sounds worse than how it sounded when I heard it last.

This crossing is on the border between Madison and Huntsville.

Airport Road Railroad Crossing, Huntsville, AL



Views:5965|Rating:4.76|View Time:1:36Minutes|Likes:20|Dislikes:1
Signal on the left: 7 pairs of Safetran 12×24 inch lights with Dialight Ball LEDs and a General Signals Type 2 electronic bell.
Signal on the right: 5 pairs of Safetran 12×24 inch lights with Dialight Ball LEDs and a General Signals Type 2 electronic bell.

This was the second crossing I caught the HMCR at.

Cleveland Avenue Railroad Crossing #1, Huntsville, AL and a Crossing Malfunction



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Cleveland Avenue seems to have trouble with westbound trains. A few months ago, I saw this crossing malfunction before a train came.

Westbound signal: 2 pairs of Safetran 12×24 inch lights, a Safetran gate mechanism, and RECO gate lights
Eastbound signal: 2 pairs of Safetran 12×24 inch lights, a Safetran Type 2 electronic bell, a Safetran gate mechanism, and RECO gate lights.

This is the only crossing in Huntsville where the bell rings throughout the entire activation every time a train comes. Oakwood Avenue will sometimes have its bell ring the entire time, but that’s rather uncommon.

James Record Road Railroad Crossing, Huntsville, AL



Views:3278|Rating:4.74|View Time:1:16Minutes|Likes:18|Dislikes:1
Signal on the left: 1 pair of RACO 8 inch lights, 1 Harmon 8 inch light, and 1 Harmon 8 inch light with a WCH 2nd Generation LED.
Signal on the right: 2 pairs of RACO 8 inch lights.
The bell is a General Signals Type 3 electronic bell mounted on the relay case.

Went out railfanning today for the first time in 2018. I only caught one train today, due to a curfew on the NS Memphis District, but I made it count. That train just so happened to be NS A81, which had finished-up switching the Jetplex Intermodal Terminal at the airport and was heading back to the main line with an NS Operation Lifesaver SD40-2 leading an NS Dash-9!

There haven’t been any changes to this crossing since I was out here last.

Governors Drive (US 431/AL 1) Railroad Crossing, Huntsville, AL



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This is the largest crossing on the HMCR and the largest crossing in Huntsville. The HMCR crosses seven lanes of traffic and a small painted median at this crossing.

Signal on the left: 6 pairs of Harmon 12×24 inch lights with Harmon Fading LEDs and a General Signals Type-2 electronic bell.
Signal on the right: 6 pairs of Harmon 12×24 inch lights with Harmon Fading LEDs and a General Signals Type-2 electronic bell.

Greenbrier Parkway Railroad Crossing, Huntsville, AL



Views:7869|Rating:4.84|View Time:2:26Minutes|Likes:61|Dislikes:2
Signal on the left: 4 pairs of Safetran 12×20 inch lights with GE Uniform Look LEDs, a General Signals Type 3 electronic bell, a Siemens gate mechanism, and RECO LED gate lights.
Far median signal: 1 pair of Safetran 12×20 inch lights with GE Uniform Look LEDs, a Siemens gate mechanism, and RECO LED gate lights.
Near median signal: 1 pair of Safetran 12×20 inch lights with GE Uniform Look LEDs, a Siemens gate mechanism, and RECO LED gate lights.
Signal on the right: 4 pairs of Safetran 12×20 inch lights with GE Uniform Look LEDs, a General Signals Type 3 electronic bell, a Siemens gate mechanism, and RECO LED gate lights.

After recording the siren test, I went out and caught NS 163 heading to Sheffield with a monster ARFP/Safe Playing 7 engine lash-up of a cab-signalless NS Dash-9 leading an NS SD60E, NS SD60M, NS Dash-9, UP SD70ACe, and two more NS Dash-9s. Haven’t seen a lash-up like this in a while, so it was quite a nice surprise!

I had heard that Greenbrier Parkway was now open, so I can out here to see if it was or not. Well, y’all can see which answer is true! So yea, the newest crossing along the NS Memphis District East End is finally open! It’s been a fun experience watching the crossing get built, and I must say that the end result looks rather nice. The road itself isn’t too busy due to being a more out of the way route to get to anything along Old Highway 20 or Greenbrier Road, but once the road gets completed, businesses build up along this road, and/or Old Highway 20 has the damaged bridge along it replaced, it’ll probably get busier. The road is a nice drive though.

Also, according to the recently posted FRA Inventory Report (filed September 26, 2017), the crossing is at MP A355.05, the NS Memphis District East End gets 23 trains a day, and the crossing is listed as being located “near Mooresville” (which, it kinda is) despite being within Huntsville’s city limits. If you want to confirm this for yourself, just go to the FRA’s website (listed below) and put in the DOT # of 960236R.

FRA Crossing Inventory & Accident Report Database:

Cox Creek Parkway (AL 17/AL 133/AL 157) Railroad Crossing, Florence, AL



Views:2252|Rating:5.00|View Time:1:51Minutes|Likes:28|Dislikes:0
*originally recorded on 8-16-18*

Signal on the left: 6 pairs of Modern Industries 12×24 inch lights and a WCH mechanical bell.
Signal on the right: 5 pairs of Modern Industries 12×24 inch lights and a WCH mechanical bell.

This was the second crossing I had caught the TSRR at on the return trip north, and one I had been wanting to get for a while. The crossing features a pair of cantilever signals with 12×24 inch lights and two 1st Generation WCH mechanical bells. I’m honestly not sure if these signals were put up by CSX or by the TSRR, though I’m gonna guess the latter, as the TSRR appears to have briefly used 12×24 inch lights. Surprisingly, this crossing has yet to receive an LED upgrade (like most crossings in Lauderdale County), as this is the largest crossing in Florence with five lanes (and a painted median, making it about 6 lanes wide) at a sharp angle, along with having three state routes across it (though the FRA forgets about AL 157 in their inventory report). AL 17 has also got a rather short concurrency here with AL 133 and AL 157, literally taking this road from the intersection behind my camera to the intersection seen right up the road in the distance.
The traffic lights at the intersection behind me don’t seem to be tied into this crossing either for some reason.
With this video though, I have recorded every active signalized crossing in Lauderdale County!

Slaughter Road Railroad Crossing, Huntsville, AL



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Signal on the left: 4 pairs of Safetran 12×20 inch lights, a General Signals Type-2 electronic bell, a Safetran gate mechanism, an NEG gate light, and RECO gate lights.
Signal on the right: 2 pairs of Safetran 12×24 inch lights, a General Signals Type-2 electronic bell, a Safetran gate mechanism, and RECO gate lights.

This train was my catch of the day, if not the whole year! The reason why is because it had an SD80MAC leading, which I hadn’t seen before at all!

Old Highway 20 Railroad Crossing, Huntsville, AL



Views:4356|Rating:4.69|View Time:3:21Minutes|Likes:15|Dislikes:1
Signal on the left: 2 pairs of Safetran 12×24 inch lights, a Safetran gate mechanism, and RECO gate lights.
Signal on the right: 2 pairs of Safetran 12×24 inch lights, a Safetran mechanical bell, a Safetran gate mechanism, and RECO gate lights.

The third train I caught today ended up being the second BNSF coal train. This one had a BNSF GEVO leading it with a BNSF SD70ACe trailing and two BNSF GEVOs on the DPU. Not the most interesting lash-up, but since the leader was a slightly older one, it wasn’t the worst either.

College Street Railroad Crossing, Auburn, AL



Views:1885|Rating:4.77|View Time:3:31Minutes|Likes:21|Dislikes:1
*originally recorded on 10-17-18*

Signal on the left: 3 pairs of Federal Signal 12×20 inch lights, 1 pair of Modern Industries 12×24 inch lights, 1 pair of Safetran 12×24 inch lights, an NEG electronic bell, a Safetran gate mechanism, and RECO(?) LED gate lights.
Signal on the right: 2 pairs of Federal Signal 12×20 inch lights, 1 pair of Modern Industries 12×24 inch lights, 1 pair of WABCO 12×20 inch lights, a dying Modern Industries mechanical bell, a WCH gate mechanism, and RECO LED gate lights.

On October 17th, I went down to the CSX WofA Subdivision in the Auburn/Opelika area to do some railfanning, as there are quite a few older signals along the line and I wasn’t lucky enough back in 2015 to get many trains along the line, only successfully catching just one. This was the first train I caught, a westbound mixed freight with an ES40DC leading an ET44AH and an AC44CW, which came within just a few minutes of me getting to this crossing.

Of all of the CSX mainlines in the state, excluding the CSX Dothan Subdivision, the CSX WofA Sub has to have the best crossing equipment in the state for a CSX mainline, especially from Auburn eastwards. This is exemplified by this crossing herem which features a pair of old cantilevers installed by the A&WP, with various upgrades over the years including a pair of WABCO 12x20s on the mast of the closer cantilever signal that were put-up by the SBD! Back in the 1990s, the far signal still had a pair of 8 inch lights on the mast of the cantilever in use as side lights, though it appears they were replaced in the early 2000s with the current Safetran 12x24s. The crossing also still retains a WCH gate mechanism, likely put up by CSX back in the 1980s, which is a bit notable as only the WofA and Dothan Subdivisions still have WCH gate mechanisms in use along them here in Alabama, as far as I’m aware. It also appears that the A&WP would have the bells on their signals set to ring until the gates rise, based on several A&WP installs I saw along the line. The gate arm on the far signal was replaced since I was last here in 2015, along with the gate lights it appears, so I have no idea if the far signal has RECO LED gate lights or NEG LED gate lights, as I didn’t think to check. Just south of this crossing is Toomer’s Corner and Auburn University.