Racism in America: Small Town 1950s Case Study Documentary Film



Views:543878|Rating:4.41|View Time:30:16Minutes|Likes:2473|Dislikes:330
Racism in the United States has been a major issue since the colonial era and the slave era. Legally sanctioned racism imposed a heavy burden on Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latin Americans. European Americans (particularly Anglo Americans) were privileged by law in matters of literacy, immigration, voting rights, citizenship, land acquisition, and criminal procedure over periods of time extending from the 17th century to the 1960s. Many non-Protestant European immigrant groups, particularly American Jews, Irish Americans, Italian Americans, as well as other immigrants from elsewhere, suffered xenophobic exclusion and other forms of discrimination in American society.

Major racially structured institutions included slavery, Indian Wars, Native American reservations, segregation, residential schools (for Native Americans), and internment camps. Formal racial discrimination was largely banned in the mid-20th century, and came to be perceived as socially unacceptable and/or morally repugnant as well, yet racial politics remain a major phenomenon. Historical racism continues to be reflected in socio-economic inequality. Racial stratification continues to occur in employment, housing, education, lending, and government.

The 20th century saw a hardening of institutionalized racism and legal discrimination against citizens of African descent in the United States. Although technically able to vote, poll taxes, acts of terror (often perpetuated by groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, founded in the Reconstruction South), and discriminatory laws such as grandfather clauses kept black Americans disenfranchised particularly in the South but also nationwide following the Hayes election at the end of the Reconstruction era in 1877. In response to de jure racism, protest and lobbyist groups emerged, most notably, the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) in 1909.

This time period is sometimes referred to as the nadir of American race relations because racism in the United States was worse during this time than at any period before or since. Segregation, racial discrimination, and expressions of white supremacy all increased. So did anti-black violence, including lynchings and race riots.

In addition, racism which had been viewed primarily as a problem in the Southern states, burst onto the national consciousness following the Great Migration, the relocation of millions of African Americans from their roots in the Southern states to the industrial centers of the North after World War I, particularly in cities such as Boston, Chicago, and New York (Harlem). In northern cities, racial tensions exploded, most violently in Chicago, and lynchings–mob-directed hangings, usually racially motivated—increased dramatically in the 1920s. As a member of the Princeton chapter of the NAACP, Albert Einstein corresponded with W. E. B. Du Bois, and in 1946 Einstein called racism America’s “worst disease.”

The Jim Crow Laws were state and local laws enacted in the Southern and border states of the United States and enforced between 1876 and 1965. They mandated “separate but equal” status for black Americans. In reality, this led to treatment and accommodations that were almost always inferior to those provided to white Americans. The most important laws required that public schools, public places and public transportation, like trains and buses, have separate facilities for whites and blacks. (These Jim Crow Laws were separate from the 1800-66 Black Codes, which had restricted the civil rights and civil liberties of African Americans.) State-sponsored school segregation was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States in 1954 in Brown v. Board of Education. Generally, the remaining Jim Crow laws were overruled by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act; none were in effect at the end of the 1960s.

Segregation continued even after the demise of the Jim Crow laws. Data on house prices and attitudes toward integration from suggest that in the mid-20th century, segregation was a product of collective actions taken by whites to exclude blacks from their neighborhoods. Segregation also took the form of redlining, the practice of denying or increasing the cost of services, such as banking, insurance, access to jobs, access to health care, or even supermarkets to residents in certain, often racially determined, areas. Although in the United States informal discrimination and segregation have always existed, the practice called “redlining” began with the National Housing Act of 1934, which established the Federal Housing Administration (FHA).

Healing Racism: A Community Dialogue (Hosted By Tina Martin)



Views:1609|Rating:4.17|View Time:57:4Minutes|Likes:10|Dislikes:2
Public media journalist Tina Martin (WBGH’s Greater Boston and Basic Black) hosts a live panel discussion and social media forum on the subject of institutional and interpersonal racism. Join PBS station WGBY and its partner, the Healing Racism Institute of Pioneer Valley, for a thoughtful and provoking look at race relations here in western New England.
Following a brief introduction to the work of the Healing Racism Institute of Pioneer Valley, Martin will welcome the contributing panelists before a live studio audience. Panelists include:
• Lisa Bakowski, Principal of Boland Elementary School in Springfield, Mass.;
• Heshimi Moja, Co-Faciltator, Healing Racism Institute Pioneer Valley;
• Bishop Talbert Swan, President of the Springfield, Mass. NAACP;
• and David Woods, Founder of Leadership Pioneer Valley.

The viewing audience is encouraged to participate in the discussion before, during, and after the show using hashtag #wgbydialogue on Facebook Facebook ( and Twitter (@wgby;

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How Churches Can Address Hidden Feelings of Prejudice and Racism



Views:2160|Rating:4.42|View Time:2:8Minutes|Likes:76|Dislikes:10
Jackie Hill Perry—writer, speaker, and artist—discusses how churches can seek to uproot sins of racism and insensitivity that can persist in a church: by creating a community that values the image of God in all people.
Editors’ note: We invite you to join the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission and The Gospel Coalition at a special event, “MLK50: Gospel Reflections from the Mountaintop,” taking place April 3–4, 2018, in Memphis, Tennessee.
Register today: www.MLK50conference.com.

Ever Wondered Whats Wrong With Black Folks? (with Michelle Alexander, author of “The New Jim Crow” )



Views:14593|Rating:4.78|View Time:1:3Minutes|Likes:193|Dislikes:9
When Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave the “I Have a Dream” 50 years ago, he had no idea Jim Crow would be replaced with another oppressive system: mass incarceration and the drug war. WATCH “Our Turn To Dream”: SUBSCRIBE:

It’s our turn to dream. Nixon started the drug war just 8 years after King’s “I have a Dream” speech. Both Reagan and Clinton continued it. In 2013 a study found that more black men were incarcerated then were enslaved in the 1850. It’s our turn to dream how to end mass incarceration. If you have a felony on your record, it’s harder to get a job and you also cannot get many forms of public assistance. In Dothan, Alabama, T.O.P.S. is offering support for people just getting out of jail-everything from clothes to GED. This is one way to end mass incarceration. It is important to see the links between civil rights, voting rights, and the drug war.

This video was produced in partnership with the NAACP, NAACP of Alabama, National Congress of Black Women, Samuel DeWitt Proctor Conference, PICO, Healing Communities, V.O.T.E., Project South, The Ordinary People Society, Operation People for Peace, New Jim Crow Movement (Jax), YourBlackWorld, All of Us or None, Drug Policy Alliance, Dream Defenders, CURE, Advocare, Campaign to End Jim Crow, Formerly Incarcerated & Convicted People’s Movement, Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, Southern Coalition for Social Justice, and Direct Action for Rights & Equality (DARE).

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How My Coloring Book Taught Me About Racism | Tiffany Bowden | TEDxCincinnati



Views:3851|Rating:4.24|View Time:6:5Minutes|Likes:61|Dislikes:11
Coloring book is a poem examining the simplicity of humanity made complicated by human constructs of race and racism. Within it Tiffany returns us back to when we were children and unafraid to embrace all colors without limitations. The poem invites us to reinvent our relationships with one another by returning to our childhood mindset. FB:Tiffany Bowden, Twitter: @creatiff2003, Instragram: @rootedgoddess, LInkedIn: Tiffany Bowden MA,PhD(ABD) Tiffany Bowden, MA, PhDc is a diversity specialist and a Cincinnati, Ohio native. Her poetry has often focused on transforming our conversation around race, gender and class and has helped to give voice to the experience of being a Black Woman in the United States. Her humanistic approach is challenging and uniting. She has been published in Black Enterprise, Academic journals, the InterActivist and more and helps to support other artists nationally as a ghost writer. She has performed her poetry in several venues across United States. She has also leveraged her technical writing ability to assist organizations compete for RFPs on diversity based projects. She conducts diversity training workshops and does speaking and performances to further the cultural conversation Tiffany Bowden, MA, PhDc is a diversity specialist and a Cincinnati, Ohio native. Her poetry has often focused on transforming our conversation around race, gender and class and has helped to give voice to the experience of being a Black Woman in the United States. Her humanistic approach is challenging and uniting. She has been published in Black Enterprise, Academic journals, the InterActivist and more and helps to support other artists nationally as a ghost writer. She has performed her poetry in several venues across United States. She has also leveraged her technical writing ability to assist organizations compete for RFPs on diversity based projects.She conducts diversity training workshops and does speaking and performances to further the cultural conversation This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at

Mind Control (Oct 14) Talking Kanye West, Idea of “Racism,” & Trump



Views:3193|Rating:4.63|View Time:1:2:3Minutes|Likes:151|Dislikes:12
Call-in: 888-775-3773. Live Sunday 9am PT (11CT/12ET). James takes your calls live on The Hake Report. Kanye’s not a token — y’all Democrats are tokens!

Today’s callers: Samuel from Sweden, Skip from Augusta, GA, Justin from Indiana, Ryan from Toronto, Canada, Bible Go-to Guy, Bruno the Doberman (WHOA), Giuseppe from TX, Kurt from TX, Mark from the 5 fwy, Maze from Dayton, OH, and KT from Maryland. Thanks, everyone! VIDEO:

Mind control – Kanye’s Periscope

Clip 14-1.A. (KANYE WEST Periscope – Mind control) People telling me what to do, I feel like they’re touching my brain, like a woman who doesn’t want her body touched…0.26
B. Beginning of periscope – mind control on social media…0.35
C. He says black people and people on social media try to control our mind, one monolithic thought…0.39

Kanye (and Jim Brown) meeting Trump at the Oval Office – Kanye talks about the idea of racism.
Clip 14-2.A. (Golden State Times) Reporter asks Kanye about him saying Bush doesn’t care about black people…0.37
B. He talks about how blacks get hung up on racism…0.33
C. A liberal will try to control blacks through the concept of racism…0.19
D. Kanye says Trump is on his hero’s journey & maybe didn’t expect a crazy MF like Kanye to support him…0.25
E. Kanye explains blacks have a problem with the word “again” so he made a MAG hat…0.37
F. Kanye wants Trump & Colin Kaepernick to wear his MAG hat at Super Bowl…0.41
G. Trump asks Kanye how it feels being in the Oval Office: Good energy…0.36

BTW: BOND now has a Medium where we repost the blogs (Church, Men’s Forum, & Women’s Forum)

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Disturbing Racism Behind The Confederate Flag, Bill O’Reilly Disagrees



Views:572778|Rating:3.66|View Time:8:50Minutes|Likes:8658|Dislikes:3163
“Last week’s massacre of nine black churchgoers by a white gunman in Charleston, South Carolina, re-ignited debates over the Confederate battle flag.

While federal and state flags were lowered to half-staff in the wake of the shooting, the symbol of the Confederate forces flew high over the state’s Capitol grounds in Columbia. That flag is padlocked in place, preventing it from being lowered to half-staff, but many activists, politicians and regular citizens want it gone altogether, citing it as a symbol of racism and hate.”

Read more here:

Cenk Uygur, host of The Young Turks, breaks it down. Tell us what you think in the comment section below.

The Young Turks June 23, 2015 Hour 1

Dylann Roof’s Burger King Meal Proves A Devastating Point

Disturbing Racism Behind The Confederate Flag, Bill O’Reilly Disagrees

Bernie’s Big Numbers Get Noticed As Socialism Polls Better Than Ever

Donald Trump Has A Big Reason To Smile [Stunning Poll]

Nikki Haley Stirs Up Racist Right Wing Hornet’s Nest

States & Retailers Abandon Confederate Flag, Holdouts Remain

USA: Hundreds march against racism in Charleston after church shooting



Views:2286|Rating:2.45|View Time:1:21Minutes|Likes:24|Dislikes:25
Hundreds of demonstrators marched through Charleston, Saturday, to protest against racism following the shooting of nine black churchgoers by a white male, believed to be 21-year-old suspect Dylann Roof, at the Emanuel AME Church on Wednesday.

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Ignoring White Privilege and Racism in the Church | ANNOTATE



Views:2027|Rating:3.15|View Time:2:17Minutes|Likes:17|Dislikes:10

Is America ignoring white privilege and racism in today’s church? Mary McClintock Fulkerson and Marcia Mount Shoop shine a light on the prevalent and underlying issue.

About their book, A Body Broken, A Body Betrayed – Race, Memory, and Eucharist in White-Dominant Churches (

Race and privilege are issues that cry out for new kinds of attention and healing in American society. More specifically, we are being called to surface the dynamics of whiteness especially in contexts where whites have had the most power in America. The church is one of those contexts–particularly churches that have traditionally been seen as the stalwarts of the American religious landscape: mainline Protestant churches.

Theologians and Presbyterian ministers Mary McClintock Fulkerson and Marcia Mount Shoop invite us to acknowledge and address the wounds of race and privilege that continue to harm and diminish the life of the church. Using Eucharist as a template for both the church’s blindness and for Christ’s redemptive capacity, this book invites faith communities, especially white-dominant churches, into new ways of re-membering what it means to be the body of Christ. In a still racialized society, can the body of Christ truly acknowledge and dress the wounds of race and privilege? Re-membering Christ’s broken and betrayed body may be just the healing path we need.

Mary is Professor of Theology at Duke Divinity School in Durham, North Carolina, and an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). She is the author of Changing the Subject: Women’s Discourses and Feminist Theology (1994) and Places of Redemption: Theology for a Worldly Church (2007).

Marcia is a theologian and the author of Touchdowns for Jesus and Other Signs of Apocalypse: Lifting the Veil on Big-Time Sports (2014), Let the Bones Dance: Embodiment and the Body of Christ (2010) and a blogger at She is also an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

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Nothing (Bonus Track) (Kai Engel) / CC BY 4.0

The Racism In Tulsa, Oklahoma Didn’t Start With Terence Crutcher!



Views:1477|Rating:4.80|View Time:6:36Minutes|Likes:47|Dislikes:2
Thom takes calls from callers Paul and Kevin, who tell the story of the Tulsa, OK bombardment, when white people attacked a prosperous black neighborhood and killed more than 300 people.

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The Ancient Paths – LDS Church’s New Statement on Racism



Views:1261|Rating:4.58|View Time:58:33Minutes|Likes:11|Dislikes:1
Interview with Don and Jerri A. Harwell from the Genesis Group, an auxilary of the LDS church that represents African Americans. The Ancient Paths is a ministry of Christ Presbyterian Church in Salt Lake City, Utah, a congregation of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. For more information, go to www.ancientpaths.tv or the church’s website at www.gospelutah.org.

Racism at Cricket Wireless store! Exposed by HEBREW ISRAELITES in Augusta GA: Men of God under fire!



Views:62|Rating:4.71|View Time:1:57Minutes|Likes:16|Dislikes:1
Men of God are being persecuted more and more in America due to degenerate men & women, racists, homosexuals, feminists, uncle toms, and all other reprobates! Biblical Truths and prophecy are being fulfilled everyday! Racism in America under Donald Trump’s Administration is definitely getting worse targeting Hebrew Israelites who are the Remnant of God!
What happened with Racist businesses nationwide like Starbucks and Papa John’s Pizza was NOT an isolated event! Racism, feminism, homosexuality, corporate injustice against minorities, black on black crime, and police corruption are plagues on society and are aimed at THE REAL CHILDREN OF ISRAEL! Beware our brothers and sisters and turn to the Most High God of Israel, fast & pray, and trust in His Holy Spirit!
Racism and religious persecution against The Real Jews and “Christians”: Hebrew Israelites in America are getting worse because WE ARE THE CHILDREN OF GOD (Deuteronomy 28-32)! And wicked and corrupt cities like Augusta & Evans Georgia are no exception to the rule!! Read Joel chapter 3 and Lamentations chapter 5!

Ignoring White Privilege and Racism in the Church | The Interview



Views:4434|Rating:3.91|View Time:25:49Minutes|Likes:72|Dislikes:20

White privilege and racism, for the most part, remains unaddressed around the heart of reconciliation; the Eucharist. In this interview, Mary McClintock Fulkerson and Marcia Mount Shoop discuss the topics in their book that address this prevalent and underlying problem.

About their book, A Body Broken, A Body Betrayed – Race, Memory, and Eucharist in White-Dominant Churches (

Race and privilege are issues that cry out for new kinds of attention and healing in American society. More specifically, we are being called to surface the dynamics of whiteness especially in contexts where whites have had the most power in America. The church is one of those contexts–particularly churches that have traditionally been seen as the stalwarts of the American religious landscape: mainline Protestant churches.

Theologians and Presbyterian ministers Mary McClintock Fulkerson and Marcia Mount Shoop invite us to acknowledge and address the wounds of race and privilege that continue to harm and diminish the life of the church. Using Eucharist as a template for both the church’s blindness and for Christ’s redemptive capacity, this book invites faith communities, especially white-dominant churches, into new ways of re-membering what it means to be the body of Christ. In a still racialized society, can the body of Christ truly acknowledge and dress the wounds of race and privilege? Re-membering Christ’s broken and betrayed body may be just the healing path we need.

Mary is Professor of Theology at Duke Divinity School in Durham, North Carolina, and an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). She is the author of Changing the Subject: Women’s Discourses and Feminist Theology (1994) and Places of Redemption: Theology for a Worldly Church (2007).

Marcia is a theologian and the author of Touchdowns for Jesus and Other Signs of Apocalypse: Lifting the Veil on Big-Time Sports (2014), Let the Bones Dance: Embodiment and the Body of Christ (2010) and a blogger at She is also an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Follow Wipf and Stock at:

Publish with us!

Shot and edited by:
Luke Smith –