Alone in St. Anne Church, Detroit, MI.



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Here’s the interior of St. Anne’s Church, Detroit, MI.

THE DETROIT PROJECT Episode 1: Exploring the Abandoned Detroit Church with the Hand Painted Ceiling



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THE DETROIT PROJECT Episode 1: Exploring the Abandoned Detroit Church with the Hand Painted Ceiling

Abandoned Detroit Church with Hand Painted Ceiling
In June of 2018 RiddimRyder and I hit the road at 5am to make it to Detroit Michigan by 8am for a full day of exploring, adventures, laughs and more.

After some questioning by the customs and border patrol agents we were finally in and ready to explore one of our favourite cities.

We would end up exploring 10 abandoned locations, mostly schools and churches as there are just so many of them.

This church was constructed in 1911 and served as a Hungarian church and also served many other religious groups until it was eventually closed and left in this abandoned state.

It is not in terrible shape, I have certainly seen worse.

The highlight of this location is the hand painted ceiling and stained glass windows that remain, mostly undamaged.

The area of Detroit where this now abandoned church is located was settled by many immigrants from Eastern Europe, especially from Hungry and Romania, in the years before World War I. A smaller number came in that short interval after World War I when the United States welcomed immigrants. There were many industries located in or near this area including the large Cadillac Clark Avenue plant that opened in 1921 and was the major production point for Cadillacs until Hamtramck Assembly opened in 1986.

The population of this area went down rapidly in the years after World War II. The homes were very modest workingmen’s structure when they were built and the area was intersected by numerous rail lines and highways used frequently by many trucks. The federal government’s housing policies after World War II made it quite easy for the residents of urban neighborhoods such as Delray—even if their incomes were low—to move to the outlying section of Detroit with their newer homes or into the booming suburban ring. I believe that this parish closed in the 1980s. At some points in the past, the church may have served as a home for an African-American congregation but there was never a very dense black population in the Delray neighborhood of Detroit. This is a rather unattractive section of Detroit. The Detroit Wastewater Treatment plant dominates the landscape

Freaktography: Photographing the typically Desolate off-limits and Derelict unseen parts of civilization. The photographer behind Freaktography is a modern day explorer choosing to seek out and show the wonders and mysteries of our own backyards through unconventional photography and adventurous Urban Exploring of Vacant and Lost Places Full of Decay

Want to use my Gear?
Here is what I use..

Nikon D7500 w/ 18-140mm VR lens –

GoPro HERO5 Black –

Sigma 10-20 Wide Angle Lens –

Nikon 50mm f/1.8 Lens –

Manfrotto 190 Go! Carbon Fiber Tripod –

Aputure Amaran 198 LED Light –

Mastercraft 200 Lumen Rechargeable Headlamp –

4,000 Lumen Rechargeable Tactical Waterproof Flashlight –

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Filmed with a Nikon D7500

Amazon Link –

Also some clips filmed with a GoPro Hero5

Amazon Link –

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Freaktography: Abandoned Places, Urban Exploration, Photography of the normally unseen and off-limits.