Seasons In The Sun – Terry Jacks 1974



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Seasons in the Sun” was a worldwide hit song for Terry Jacks in 1974. It was first released in the United States and Canada early in the year, and rose to number one in America by March 2. An earlier recording appeared on The Kingston Trio’s 1963 album, Time to Think. The song had also been done by English band The Fortunes in 1968, and by Pearls Before Swine in 1970/71.

The song was based on “Le Moribond” (“The Dying Man”), written by Jacques Brel in 1961. Brel’s song was translated into English by poet Rod McKuen and this version was first recorded by Bob Shane of the Kingston Trio, but it did not sell. The Beach Boys also recorded the song but it was never released.

Terry Jacks, who had participated in the Beach Boys recording, and who had in fact introduced the song to the group, rewrote part of the lyrics to “lighten them up.” Jacks’ revisions tended to add a bit of ambiguity as to the nature of the storyteller’s demise, allowing listeners the option to choose whether the death is from suicide over a failed life – quite possibly to escape drug addiction – or someone accepting death from natural causes, or cancer. References to a cheating wife were also removed.

Will You Be Ready (VHS) – The Bolton Brothers,”Revival In Atlanta”



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The Bolton Brothers continue in their excellent ways on their third project for Blackberry Records, this time moving beyond the bounds of Memphis into Atlanta.

Their decades of singing experience shine through on every note on this new project, titled Revival in Atlanta. There’s nothing real fancy here, and that’s a good thing. Because you shouldn’t fiddle with great traditional group singing.

The project is crammed with songs that lean on the tried and true themes of old, with encouragement, exhortation, anticipation and testimony all wrapped up in hearty vocals under the production guidance of The Williams Brothers.

Kicking things off is “Come & Go”, an apt introductory number for no other reason than four of the Boltons take their turn on lead. The songs motors on with rich and busy keyboard support till half way through, when key changes kick into heavy drive, relentless pushing the as heaven is described in wonder.

The Bolton BrothersVocal interplay is always excellent with The Bolton Brothers, with trading leads and some wonderful and sometimes wordless improvisations. On this CD, you can hear all of this on the slowly turning “I’m Going Through”, one of several songs that also features the New Hope Baptist Church Choir with overdub supplements from Jackson Mississippi’s EnPraise Singers. At just under eight minutes, it’s still too short.

On “To See Jesus”, brothers James and L.W. share the mic on the soft start, with falsetto entries and only touches of instrumentation behind them. To shouts of encouragement from the congregation, the song moves into the main melody which has some interesting and unexpected twists. The second half of this album jewel (the song is split into two tracks) brings in brother James as well as the renowned Bishop James Morton, who pastors the New Beginning Full Gospel Baptist Church in Decatur, Georgia, where the album was recorded.

The Bolton Brothers satisfy demand for no doubt traditional quartet singing several times, with songs such as “Let It Be Real” and “Bless The Name of Jesus”. Their interpretation of the familiar “Come By Here” is excellent.

“Oh How I Love You” is one of a couple of cuts that uses churchy sounding rhythms with non-traditional beats. Semi-contemporary chorus backing from choirs amidst wailing guitar from Undra Watts underlines the vocals as Minister Cedric King and James Bolton share lead.

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Growing Food in Raised Bed Gardens at Old South Church in Boston



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John from goes on a field trip to Boston, MA to visit Old South Church where they are growing food in the middle of Boston to feed the needy. Many churches have land and space available for community gardens and/or to grow food for the needy.

Metal Detecting A Ghost Town Finds Awesome Boot Plate, Coins and Relics on the Surface!



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Watch our full length metal detecting movie here Team Dirt Fishin America travels to a long lost ghost town to metal detect in the high desert of Nevada. The dry desert doesn’t allow much to sink, leaving the coins and relics virtually on the surface! Chinese coins, seated liberty and more! Finding, coins and relics. Digging the past!

Rev. Marwan Beem from Israel (LANDMARK TABERNACLE CHURCH Fort Worth TX)



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A sermon by Rev. Marwan Beem at Landmark Tabernacle Church. Please visit our website at landmarktabftworth.com

Old Brownsville Texas City Jail Paranormal Investigation – Audio Enhanced



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The Graveyard Shift Paranormal Investigations team investigated the Brownsville, Texas Old City Jail building back in February 2012, here is the investigation and paranormal evidence. The audio has been enhanced and made louder on this video, due to the sound quality on the previously uploaded video. Graveyard Shift Paranormal maintains the commercial right to everything in this video.

No Helper (LANDMARK TABERNACLE CHURCH Fort Worth TX)



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A sermon by Pastor Jerry Wilkerson from Landmark Tabernacle Church. Please visit our website at landmarktabftworth.com

1967: Mature women buying indian colored corn farmstand market. PALMDALE, CALIFORNIA



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“Royalty free licensing options from these stock footage marketplaces:

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description: Original vintage 8mm film home movie professionally cleaned and captured in 4k (3840×2160 UHD) resolution at 23.97 fps to recreate true filmy look and feel. Post processing including cinematic retro color correction, manual speed adjustment with true-speed time preservation technique, custom action crop movement, and modern halogen lighting with advanced degrain filters with modified 1.6 f-stop projector reverse convex lens. Learn more about our footage restoration library here: and major thanks for supporting the archival of humanity’s history.”

Vulnerablity of Victory (LANDMARK TABERNACLE CHURCH Fort Worth TX)



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A sermon by Pastor Jerry Wilkerson from Landmark Tabernacle Church. Please visit our website at landmarktabftworth.com

Abandoned Farmhouse-Chaska, Minnesota



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An abandoned farmhouse near Chaska, Minnesota. By the looks of the place, it has been used as a dumping ground for quite a while. There were refrigerators, chairs, car repair manuals, mattresses and much more laying around.

Dragnet: Big Escape / Big Man Part 1 / Big Man Part 2



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Dragnet is a radio and television crime drama about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a “dragnet”, meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects.

Dragnet debuted inauspiciously. The first several months were bumpy, as Webb and company worked out the program’s format and eventually became comfortable with their characters (Friday was originally portrayed as more brash and forceful than his later usually relaxed demeanor). Gradually, Friday’s deadpan, fast-talking persona emerged, described by John Dunning as “a cop’s cop, tough but not hard, conservative but caring.” (Dunning, 210) Friday’s first partner was Sergeant Ben Romero, portrayed by Barton Yarborough, a longtime radio actor. After Yarborough’s death in 1951 (and therefore Romero’s, who also died of a heart attack, as acknowledged on the December 27, 1951 episode “The Big Sorrow”), Friday was partnered with Sergeant Ed Jacobs (December 27, 1951 – April 10, 1952, subsequently transferred to the Police Academy as an instructor), played by Barney Phillips; Officer Bill Lockwood (Ben Romero’s nephew, April 17, 1952 – May 8, 1952), played by Martin Milner (with Ken Peters taking the role for the June 12, 1952 episode “The Big Donation”); and finally Frank Smith, played first by Herb Ellis (1952), then Ben Alexander (September 21, 1952-1959). Raymond Burr was on board to play the Chief of Detectives. When Dragnet hit its stride, it became one of radio’s top-rated shows.
Webb insisted on realism in every aspect of the show. The dialogue was clipped, understated and sparse, influenced by the hardboiled school of crime fiction. Scripts were fast moving but didn’t seem rushed. Every aspect of police work was chronicled, step by step: From patrols and paperwork, to crime scene investigation, lab work and questioning witnesses or suspects. The detectives’ personal lives were mentioned but rarely took center stage. (Friday was a bachelor who lived with his mother; Romero, a Mexican-American from Texas, was an ever fretful husband and father.) “Underplaying is still acting”, Webb told Time. “We try to make it as real as a guy pouring a cup of coffee.” (Dunning, 209) Los Angeles police chiefs C.B. Horrall, William A. Worton, and (later) William H. Parker were credited as consultants, and many police officers were fans.

Most of the later episodes were entitled “The Big _____”, where the key word denoted a person or thing in the plot. In numerous episodes, this would the principal suspect, victim, or physical target of the crime, but in others was often a seemingly inconsequential detail eventually revealed to be key evidence in solving the crime. For example, in “The Big Streetcar” the background noise of a passing streetcar helps to establish the location of a phone booth used by the suspect.

Throughout the series’ radio years, one can find interesting glimpses of pre-renewal Downtown L.A., still full of working class residents and the cheap bars, cafes, hotels and boarding houses which served them. At the climax of the early episode “James Vickers”, the chase leads to the Subway Terminal Building, where the robber flees into one of the tunnels only to be killed by an oncoming train. Meanwhile, by contrast, in other episodes set in outlying areas, it is clear that the locations in question are far less built up than they are today. Today, the Imperial Highway, extending 40 miles east from El Segundo to Anaheim, is a heavily used boulevard lined almost entirely with low-rise commercial development. In an early Dragnet episode scenes along the Highway, at “the road to San Pedro”, clearly indicate that it still retained much the character of a country highway at that time.

Baruch (LANDMARK TABERNACLE CHURCH Fort Worth TX)



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A sermon by Pastor Jerry Wilkerson from Landmark Tabernacle Church. Please visit our website at landmarktabftworth.com

He Who Looks For A City (LANDMARK TABERNACLE CHURCH Fort Worth TX)



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A sermon by Pastor Jerry Wilkerson from Landmark Tabernacle Church. Please visit our website at landmarktabftworth.com