Boom (New Mexico) – Dr. Lodge McCammon’s #50StatesAlbum



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Download the mp3, lyrics and additional materials from Discovery Education Streaming

50 States Album: A 50-song album covering the basic history, geography, and economic structure of each state in the U.S.

Lyrics/Explanation –

1st Verse:
A seeker of gold said Nuevo Mexico
Spanish settled for more than 100 years ’till revolution by the Pueblo
When de Vargas died, New Spain took back control
129 years, Spanish settlements continued to grow
Louisiana Purchase bought our top from France
Then in 1821 we went with Mexico and their independence
But war with America lost them some land
New Mexico, part of which Texas claimed,
Under the circumstance

Explanation of the 1st Verse:
In 1563 Francisco de Ibarra, a Spanish explorer and seeker of gold, visited the land of New Mexico (NM) and called it “Nuevo Mexico.” The name was officially established in 1598.
The Pueblo, Apache and Navajo all were inhabitants in NM when the Europeans arrived in the 16th century. In 1680 the Pueblo revolted against the Spanish settlement. They won, keeping the Spanish out from 1680-1692. Diego de Vargas successfully led a campaign to reclaim NM for New Spain in 1692 from the Pueblo and their leader Pope. Even though New Spain officially quelled the Pueblo revolution, there was bitterness and fighting until the beginning of the 1700s until Diego de Vargas died (1704). After his death, NM slowly became more colonized and controlled.
In 1803 the U.S. made the Louisiana Purchase from France. The northeast corner of NM was included in that purchase.
In 1821 New Spain won their independence from Spain and changed their name to Mexico. NM was part of the territory that Mexico controlled.
In 1848 America gained land in the southeast after winning the Mexican-American War.
Upon winning its independence from Mexico, Texas claimed a considerable portion of eastern NM, but for $10 million they gave up the claim.

Chorus:
Way before Mexico
Nuevo Mexico they called us this
When in the 1500s Spanish searched for gold
In this Land of Enchantment – hey hey hey
Part of New Spain, then Mexico, then the U.S.
The 47th state, New Mexico made the list
(In 1912, yeah New Mexico made the list)

Explanation of the Chorus:
New Mexico got its name 223 years before New Spain changed its name to Mexico.
In the mid 1500s, Spanish Explorers thought that the NM area contained wealth similar to the Aztec (Mexica) Empire. Therefore, they called the land “Nuevo Mexico”
NM’s nickname is the “Land of Enchantment”
NM has been controlled by New Spain, Mexico, and the U.S.
NM was the 47th state to be admitted into the U.S. They “made the list” because they were required to drop a dispute with Texas over the ownership of land. In 1912 NM was second to last contiguous state to be admitted in the U.S.

2nd Verse:
The Sangre de Cristos run north to south
A southern part of the Rocky Mountains with the Rio Grande about
Arid desert around Roswell and Las Cruces
Travel north toward Santa Fe – see mountains, wilderness and forests
120,000 square miles of broken mesas
Go east from Albuquerque to the oasis
You’re in the high plains now with prairies and some grass
Great for agriculture or to start a cattle ranch

Explanation of the 2nd Verse:
The Sangre de Cristos Mountains run from the northwest corner of NM toward the middle center of the state. This range is the southernmost part of the Rocky Mountains.
The Rio Grande runs along the western side of the Sangre de Cristos range.
In the south of NM, there are deserts around areas like Roswell and Las Cruces.
As you head north toward cities like the capital (Santa Fe), you will find mountains, wilderness and forests.
NM is 121,412 square miles, much of which is desert land filled with broken mesas – large table-top-looking structures in the desert formed of rock and dirt.
Albuquerque is in the center of the state. If you travel southwest from Albuquerque, you end up on the eastern border in the Oasis State Park.
The eastern part of NM is in the high plains known for prairies and grasslands. This is the area in the U.S. best known for agriculture and cattle ranches.

Bridge:
Crescit Eundo, it grows as it goes
While the ancient sun symbol of the Zia unfurls
On the New Mexico flag when the roadrunner knows
To find shade under the pinyon tree
Where the white yucca grows

Explanation of the Bridge:

3rd Verse:
Come to Nuevo Mexico for travel or business
For Native American imagery, crude old, and federal spending missions
You’ll find air force bases, ranges and secret labs
We test our latest innovations out in the White Sands

Explanation of the 3rd Verse:

Evangelist M.A.J.O.R.S. – Believers Of One Messiah Church (B.O.O.M. JAX)



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Evangelist William M.A.J.O.R.S. Brown is leading a thriving Messianic Hebrew assembly call B.O.O.M. Believers Of One Messiah in Jacksonville, Florida for more information contact us.

Vocations to priesthood boom in Wichita, Kansas



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Father Chad Arnold, vocations director in the Diocese of Wichita, Kansas, is hesitant to dole out advice about how a diocese can increase its priestly vocations.

He recognizes that he’s been blessed.

At a time when bishops and vocations directors across the universal Church are wringing their hands about a dire shortage of priests, Wichita has ordained 10 men to the priesthood for the second year in a row, upping their priestly population by about 20 percent.

“I wish there were an easy, A-B-C sort of answer, but in reality it’s so many things we are blessed with that I believe aid our vocations,” Arnold told CNA.

One of those things is a commitment to perpetual adoration chapels in diocesan parishes.

“We have a high number of perpetual adoration chapels throughout our diocese, so we have a lot of young men spending time before the Lord in the Blessed Sacrament,” he said. “That moment of silence is so critical to hear the Lord speaking to them, so that availability is there.”

The diocese has also been blessed with priests “who work hard and live their faith and take joy in their priesthood and provide tremendous examples and models for the young men in the parishes,” Arnold added, as well as good and faithful bishops who have directed the diocese well.

Six men who were ordained as priests of Wichita have since become bishops, including Bishop Shawn McKnight, who was installed in February as Bishop of Jefferson City, Mo.

The diocese, which sits in the southeast corner of the state, covers 20,021 square miles over 25 counties, and is home to 114,195 Catholics in 90 parishes. While most of these parishes are covered by one priest, the recent bumper crops of priestly ordinations means that some larger parishes with hundreds of families are able to have two or even three priests.

Austin Nevada – Part 2 “The Way It Was Grand Tour”



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It all started in 1862 when a pony express ride by the name of W.H. Talcott’s horse kicked up a rock at the mouth of pony canyon which turned out to be high grade silver and gold ore. This led to a silver rush by the time the mid 1860s rolled around this town boasted a lumber mill, saloons, brothels, assay office, banks, hospital, hotels, telegraph station, four hundred houses and at least 10k residents. Although floods, fires and elements have erased a large portion of this living ghost town what does remain are some of the finest structures in the wild west such as its frontier churches. Austin held the Lander County seat for many decades it also brought millions of dollars in silver revenue and for a short time hosted the Nevada Central Railroad. This was a town that boasted the good, bad and the ugly everything from epidemics to axe yielding men and frontier justice. Austin not only has one of the oldest saloons/hotels in the state but one of the last Greek revival court houses in the nation and one of the oldest operating Nevadan newspapers that still exist today. Today life has slowed down in Austin to about 200 residents. Many shops thrive on tourism and the sale of there jewelry. Life in this canyon dates back to 3,500 years ago when the Shoshone used Pony Canyon to hunt and sustain themselves. We welcome you to journey with us as I take our friends and viewers to the way it was!

www.paranormalghostsociety.org/AustinNevada.htm

Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks



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My advice is this: Settle! That’s right. Don’t worry about passion or intense connection. Don’t nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling “Bravo!” in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It’s hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who’s changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.)

Obviously, I wasn’t always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry’s Kids aren’t going to walk, even if you send them money. It’s not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it’s downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality.

Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there’s supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn’t feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it’s unlikely.

And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she’ll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It’s equally questionable whether Sex and the City’s Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)

Red White and Boom | Lexington, Ky 2016 | Eric Church | CAM | Kasey Musgraves



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Remembering Oilton, Creek county Oklahoma



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From OHS
Oilton had its start during the oil boom in the Cushing-Drimright Field. In 1915 town lots were sold and on May 5, 1915, a post office was established. By mid-1915 the First State Bank opened, and the Gusher newspaper was first issued. Also in 1915 the Oil Belt Terminal Railway and the Oil Fields and Santa Fe Railway constructed lines that would connect Oilton with Jennings and Cushing. On March 24, 1915, approximately five thousand people witnessed the first passenger train arrive in Oilton.

By 1918 the burgeoning town had four hotels and several restaurants serving oil-field workers. In 1920 the town had a population of 2,231. As the need for road-building material increased, a rock crusher was established two miles east of the town in 1923. By the mid-1920s Oilton had five churches and five school buildings. Local farmers grew cash crops such as watermelons, cantaloupes, corn, and cotton as well as apples, pears, and peaches.

In the 1930s one cotton gin, eight oil companies, and ten gasoline plants operated. In September 1954 the Southwestern Bell Telephone Company started construction on a building that housed equipment enabling customers to convert from crank-type to dial telephones. In December 1961 a new brick building replaced the former post office facility, which dated to 1919.

After the population peaked in 1920 during the oil boom, it declined to 1,518 in 1930. Numbers continued to dwindle to 1,225 in 1940 and 1,087 in 1970. Population rose to 1,244 in 1980 only to drop to 1,060 in 1990. As of the 2010 census, Oilton had 1,013 citizens.

St. Paul Abilene Full Service, 1/28/18 8:30am: Dustin Tatro Preaching



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Text: Psalm 72, lectionary text for Epiphany 2018
“Aslan is on the Move”
Sermon for satisfaction of Board of Ordained Ministry requirements in Northwest Texas for a provisional deacon, year one.