Andrew Jackson | Wikipedia audio article



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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:
Andrew Jackson

Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
– increases imagination and understanding
– improves your listening skills
– improves your own spoken accent
– learn while on the move
– reduce eye strain

Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

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“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”
– Socrates

SUMMARY
=======
Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh President of the United States from 1829 to 1837. Before being elected to the presidency, Jackson gained fame as a general in the United States Army and served in both houses of Congress. As president, Jackson sought to advance the rights of the “common man” against a “corrupt aristocracy” and to preserve the Union.
Born in the colonial Carolinas to a Scotch-Irish family in the decade before the American Revolutionary War, Jackson became a frontier lawyer and married Rachel Donelson Robards. He served briefly in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate representing Tennessee. After resigning, he served as a justice on the Tennessee Supreme Court from 1798 until 1804. Jackson purchased a property later known as The Hermitage, and became a wealthy, slaveowning planter. In 1801, he was appointed colonel of the Tennessee militia and was elected its commander the following year. He led troops during the Creek War of 1813–1814, winning the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. The subsequent Treaty of Fort Jackson required the Creek surrender of vast lands in present-day Alabama and Georgia. In the concurrent war against the British, Jackson’s victory in 1815 at the Battle of New Orleans made him a national hero. Jackson then led U.S. forces in the First Seminole War, which led to the annexation of Florida from Spain. Jackson briefly served as Florida’s first territorial governor before returning to the Senate. He ran for president in 1824, winning a plurality of the popular and electoral vote. As no candidate won an electoral majority, the House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams in a contingent election. In reaction to the alleged “corrupt bargain” between Adams and Henry Clay and the ambitious agenda of President Adams, Jackson’s supporters founded the Democratic Party.
Jackson ran again in 1828, defeating Adams in a landslide. Jackson faced the threat of secession by South Carolina over what opponents called the “Tariff of Abominations.” The crisis was defused when the tariff was amended, and Jackson threatened the use of military force if South Carolina attempted to secede. In Congress, Henry Clay led the effort to reauthorize the Second Bank of the United States. Jackson, regarding the Bank as a corrupt institution, vetoed the renewal of its charter. After a lengthy struggle, Jackson and his allies thoroughly dismantled the Bank. In 1835, Jackson became the only president to completely pay off the national debt, fulfilling a longtime goal. His presidency marked the beginning of the ascendancy of the party “spoils system” in American politics. In 1830, Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, which forcibly relocated most members of the Native American tribes in the South to Indian Territory. In foreign affairs, Jackson’s administration concluded a “most favored nation” treaty with Great Britain, settled claims of damages against France from the Napoleonic Wars, and recognized the Republic of Texas. In January 1835, he survived the first assassination attempt on a sitting president.
In his retirement, Jackson remained active in Democratic Party politics, supporting the presidencies of Martin Van Buren and James K. Polk. Though fearful of its effects on the slavery debate, Jackson advocated the annexation of Texas, which was accomplished shortly before his death. Jackson has been widely revered in the United States as an advocate for democracy and the common man. Many of his actions, such as those during the Bank War, proved divisive, garnering both fervent support and strong opposition from many in the country. His reputation has suffered since the 1970s, largely due to his role in Indian removal. Surveys of historians and scholars have ranked Jackson favorably among United States presidents.

Andrew Jackson | Wikipedia audio article



Views:12|Rating:0.00|View Time:2:8:13Minutes|Likes:0|Dislikes:0
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:
Andrew Jackson

Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
– increases imagination and understanding
– improves your listening skills
– improves your own spoken accent
– learn while on the move
– reduce eye strain

Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at:

You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through:

“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”
– Socrates

SUMMARY
=======
Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh President of the United States from 1829 to 1837. Before being elected to the presidency, Jackson gained fame as a general in the United States Army and served in both houses of Congress. As president, Jackson sought to advance the rights of the “common man” against a “corrupt aristocracy” and to preserve the Union.
Born in the colonial Carolinas to a Scotch-Irish family in the decade before the American Revolutionary War, Jackson became a frontier lawyer and married Rachel Donelson Robards. He served briefly in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate representing Tennessee. After resigning, he served as a justice on the Tennessee Supreme Court from 1798 until 1804. Jackson purchased a property later known as The Hermitage, and became a wealthy, slaveowning planter. In 1801, he was appointed colonel of the Tennessee militia and was elected its commander the following year. He led troops during the Creek War of 1813–1814, winning the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. The subsequent Treaty of Fort Jackson required the Creek surrender of vast lands in present-day Alabama and Georgia. In the concurrent war against the British, Jackson’s victory in 1815 at the Battle of New Orleans made him a national hero. Jackson then led U.S. forces in the First Seminole War, which led to the annexation of Florida from Spain. Jackson briefly served as Florida’s first territorial governor before returning to the Senate. He ran for president in 1824, winning a plurality of the popular and electoral vote. As no candidate won an electoral majority, the House of Representatives elected John Quincy Adams in a contingent election. In reaction to the alleged “corrupt bargain” between Adams and Henry Clay and the ambitious agenda of President Adams, Jackson’s supporters founded the Democratic Party.
Jackson ran again in 1828, defeating Adams in a landslide. Jackson faced the threat of secession by South Carolina over what opponents called the “Tariff of Abominations.” The crisis was defused when the tariff was amended, and Jackson threatened the use of military force if South Carolina attempted to secede. In Congress, Henry Clay led the effort to reauthorize the Second Bank of the United States. Jackson, regarding the Bank as a corrupt institution, vetoed the renewal of its charter. After a lengthy struggle, Jackson and his allies thoroughly dismantled the Bank. In 1835, Jackson became the only president to completely pay off the national debt, fulfilling a longtime goal. His presidency marked the beginning of the ascendancy of the party “spoils system” in American politics. In 1830, Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, which forcibly relocated most members of the Native American tribes in the South to Indian Territory. In foreign affairs, Jackson’s administration concluded a “most favored nation” treaty with Great Britain, settled claims of damages against France from the Napoleonic Wars, and recognized the Republic of Texas. In January 1835, he survived the first assassination attempt on a sitting president.
In his retirement, Jackson remained active in Democratic Party politics, supporting the presidencies of Martin Van Buren and James K. Polk. Though fearful of its effects on the slavery debate, Jackson advocated the annexation of Texas, which was accomplished shortly before his death. Jackson has been widely revered in the United States as an advocate for democracy and the common man. Many of his actions, such as those during the Bank War, proved divisive, garnering both fervent support and strong opposition from many in the country. His reputation has suffered since the 1970s, largely due to his role in Indian removal. Surveys of historians and scholars have ranked Jackson favorably among United States presidents.

St Andrew School – Chicago, Illinois Video Tour 2013



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This is a video tour of St. Andrew School in Chicago, Illinois. They are open for tours on the second Tuesday of every month at 9am. For additional information call 773.248.2500 or visit them on the web at www.gosaintandrew.com. St. Andrew School – providing excellence in a vibrant and caring catholic environment.

Transcending Faith Andrew Farley Testimony



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Dr. Andrew Farley is truly one of a kind. His perspective on faith and the Bible is not only bold and thought provoking but refreshing and simple. His teachings are sure to challenge your understanding of church and the gospels. Dr. Farley strips away the religiosity of church talk and gets down to what he calls “The Naked Gospel”.
Dr. Farley is the Senior Pastor of Ecclesia Church in Lubbock, Texas, the Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics at Texas Tech University, the author of books “The Naked Gospel”, “A Climate for Change”(authored by both Dr. Farley and his wife Katherine Hayhoe), and “God Without Religion”, and a devoted husband and father.
Journey with Dr. Farley as he gives his powerful testimony about his struggle to break away from The Law to find rest in the New Covenant.

You can check out more about Dr. Farley at

You can purchase his new book “God without Religion” at

Music by : Steve Soulbasics – “I Got Jesus”
Sue Stonebender – “Legendary Grace”

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An Approach to Extended Memorization of Scripture by Dr. Andrew Davis, Video #5



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Memorizing extended portions of Scripture is hard work. Andy Davis, Senior Pastor at First Baptist Church of Durham, North Carolina and author of An Approach to Extended Memorization of Scripture offers encouragement from Proverbs which says that all hard work leads to profit.

Learn More:

An Approach to Extended Memorization of Scripture by Dr. Andrew Davis, Video #1



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Andy Davis, Senior Pastor at First Baptist Church of Durham, North Carolina and author of An Approach to Extended Memorization of Scripture explains why it’s important for Christians to commit to memorizing the Word of God.

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Love Has Come by Andrew Blooms – Live on Milledge Ave



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Andrew Blooms performs his original song “Love Has Come” Live on Milledge Avenue in Athens, GA. Love Has Come will be on Andrew’s debut record “From My Window To Yours.”

Follow along at www.andrewblooms.com
filmed by Gray Hauser
Mixed and Engineered by Andrew Huang

I won’t fear the night. I won’t fear the cold. Cause I know you’ve gone before.

I see the birds and how you feed them all. But how you love me even more.

My Love Has Come

I will let things die, so you can make things grow. Let me trust you even more.

Through the seasons tides, and all this push and pull, let me trust you even more.

My Love Has Come

You can have my life, if I can have your heart. You’ve become my only one.

You’ve become my only one.

An Approach to Extended Memorization of Scripture by Dr. Andrew Davis, Video #3



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Memorizing Scripture is one of the most powerful weapons we have in fighting the good fight of faith, according to Andy Davis, Senior Pastor at First Baptist Church of Durham, North Carolina and author of An Approach to Extended Memorization of Scripture.
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Church of St. Andrew, Lviv in 3D 8K 360 #Kandao camera



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3d effect you can see only with special goggles. Church of St. Andrew, Lviv in 3D 8K 360 #Kandao camera EV -0.3 Log mode graded with LUT, Stitched and stabilized in #Mistika
Write to me if you need this video or need to shoot something special for your 360 project. More info on my FB page: