Gabby Barrett: Country Girl SMASHES The ‘Idol’ Stage! | American Idol 2018



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#Full Segment | American Idol on ABC | Season 1 | Top 14

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ABOUT AMERICAN IDOL
AMERICAN IDOL, the iconic series that revolutionized the television landscape by pioneering the music competition genre, will return to airwaves on SUNDAY, MARCH 11 at 8|7c, at its new home on ABC. The nationwide search for the next superstar kicked off in August 2017, as the Idol Bus traveled from Portland, Oregon, to Orlando, Florida, in its pursuit for talent, covering 23 cities across the country. Auditioning was made easier than ever as hopefuls also had the opportunity to submit audition videos online, as well as via select social media platforms using an official tag, #TheNextIdol, cultivating over 300,000 posts. Also, for the first time in “American Idol” history, hopefuls had the opportunity to audition through a livestream platform. Helping to determine who America will ultimately vote for to become the next singing sensation, are music industry forces and superstar judges, Luke Bryan, Katy Perry and Lionel Richie. Emmy® Award-winning host and producer Ryan Seacrest will return as host of the beloved series.

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Talent Recap is the #1 independent website which is exclusively dedicated to the fans of the most popular talent shows around the world. As passionate fans of these shows, we provide news, analysis and fan engagement on America’s Got Talent, Britain’s Got Talent, The Voice, The X Factor, American Idol, The Four and its contestants.

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Cade Foehner Sings “Black Magic Woman” by Santana – Top 14 – American Idol 2018 on ABC



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Cade Foehner sings “Black Magic Woman” by Santana for his Top 14 performance in front of a live audience and Judges Luke Bryan, Katy Perry and Lionel Richie on American Idol 2018.

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AMERICAN IDOL, the iconic series that revolutionized the television landscape by pioneering the music competition genre, will return to airwaves on SUNDAY, MARCH 11 at 8|7c, at its new home on ABC.

The nationwide search for the next superstar kicked off in August 2017, as the Idol Bus traveled from Portland, Oregon, to Orlando, Florida, in its pursuit for talent, covering 23 cities across the country. Auditioning was made easier than ever as hopefuls also had the opportunity to submit audition videos online, as well as via select social media platforms using an official tag, #TheNextIdol, cultivating over 300,000 posts. Also, for the first time in “American Idol” history, hopefuls had the opportunity to audition through a livestream platform.

Helping to determine who America will ultimately vote for to become the next singing sensation, are music industry forces and superstar judges, Luke Bryan, Katy Perry and Lionel Richie. Emmy® Award-winning host and producer Ryan Seacrest will return as host of the beloved series.

American Drug War: The Last White Hope



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The War on Drugs has become the longest and most costly war in American history, the question has become, how much more can the country endure? Inspired by the death of four family members from “legal drugs” Texas filmmaker Kevin Booth sets out to discover why the Drug War has become such a big failure.

American Civil War | Wikipedia audio article



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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:
American Civil War

Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
– increases imagination and understanding
– improves your listening skills
– improves your own spoken accent
– learn while on the move
– reduce eye strain

Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

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“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”
– Socrates

SUMMARY
=======
The American Civil War (also known by other names) was a war fought in the United States (U.S.) from 1861 to 1865. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in U.S. history. Largely as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people, war broke out in April 1861, when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina, shortly after United States President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states’ rights to uphold slavery.
Among the 34 U.S. states in February 1861, seven Southern slave states individually declared their secession from the country to form the Confederate States of America. The Confederacy grew to include eleven states, all of them slaveholding. The Confederacy was never diplomatically recognized by the United States government, nor was it recognized by any foreign country. The states that remained loyal to the U.S. were known as the Union. The Union and Confederacy quickly raised volunteer and conscription armies that fought mostly in the South over the course of four years. Intense combat left 620,000 to 750,000 people dead, more than the number of U.S. military deaths in all other wars combined.The Union finally won the war when General Robert E. Lee surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant at the Battle of Appomattox Court House, followed with a series of surrenders by Confederate generals throughout the southern states. Much of the South’s infrastructure was destroyed, especially the transportation systems. The Confederacy collapsed, slavery was abolished, and 4 million black slaves were freed. The Reconstruction Era (1863–1877) overlapped and followed the war, with the process of restoring national unity, strengthening the national government, and granting civil rights to freed black slaves throughout the country.

INTERVIEW WITH A GAME AMERICAN PIT BULL TERRIER BREEDER



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PLEASE BE CLEAR THIS IS NEITHER A PROMOTION OR EXCUSE FOR THE HEINOUS ACT OF DOG FIGHTING.

This video is without a doubt, the most challenging clip I’ve had to do. I went north of LA a couple hours to film a Game DogThe American pit bull terrier possesses the ultimate combination of strength, agility, and endurance of any dog breed.. This video goes beyond the gratuitous clips you’ll see on Worldstar and really gets to the truth of this exceptional dog athlete.

Ronald Reagan: An American Journey



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Experience the astonishing political career of one of the most influential and popular political figures of the past three decades with this in-depth look at Ronald Reagan, the 40th President of the United States. Now you can relive the historical milestones that shaped him including his early political career as governor, his debates with Carter and Mondale, the assassination attempt, his trailblazing relations with major international leaders like Margaret Thatcher and Mikhail Gorbachev, and his relationship with his wife, Nancy. This remarkable, feature-length look at Reagan’s achievements is packed with incredible archival footage including highlights and news coverage from his groundbreaking speeches and debates as well as the major world events he faced in office. From his early political career to his eight years leading his country, Reagan changed the face of modern American politics and became immediately recognized as a statesman and speaker like no other, and now his legacy continues with this essential portrait of one of America’s most important leaders.
MPAA Rating: NOTRATED

Changing Narratives: What Does It Mean to Be an American Today?



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The MacArthur Foundation brought together Define American Founder Jose Antonio Vargas and Executive Director of the Inner-City Muslim Action Network and MacArthur Fellow Rami Nashashibi at an event in Chicago April 19, 2018, to explore what citizenship means to them and communities they serve. The discussion was moderated by Melba Lara, host of Chicago Public Media’s All Things Considered.

Traditional American Song – Oh Susanna



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Oh, I come from Alabama, with my banjo on my knee. I’m goin’ to Louisiana My true love for to see.
Oh! Susanna, now don’t you cry for me. For I come from Alabama, with my banjo on my knee.
It rained all night the day I left; The weather was so dry. The sun so hot I froze to death. Susanna don’t you cry. Oh! Susanna, now don’t you cry for me. For I come from Alabama, with my banjo on my knee.
I had a dream the other night When everything was still; I thought I saw Susanna, A-comin’ down the hill. Oh! Susanna, now don’t you cry for me. For I come from Alabama, with my banjo on my knee.
A buckwheat cake was in her mouth; A tear was in her eye. I said, “I come from Dixie Land; Susanna, don’t you cry!” Oh! Susanna, now don’t you cry for me. For I come from Alabama, with my banjo on my knee.
In 1846, Stephen Foster moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, and became a bookkeeper with his brother’s steamship company. While in Cincinnati, Foster wrote “Oh! Susanna”, possibly for his men’s social club.[1][2] The song was first performed by a local quintet at a concert in Andrews’ Eagle Ice Cream Saloon in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on September 11, 1847.[3] It was first published by W. C. Peters & Co. in Cincinnati in 1848.[4] Other minstrel troupes performed the work, and, as was common at the time, many registered the song for copyright under their own names. As a result, it was copyrighted and published at least 21 times[5] from February 25, 1848, through February 14, 1851.[2
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Baptism Ceremony of African American converts,United States HD Stock Footage



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Baptism Ceremony of African American converts,United States

African American woman candidate is docked in water by African American priest and three other Nego helpers during a baptism ceremony of African American converts. African American men and women sing and praise at bank of the river. Location: Montgomery Alabama. Date: August 29, 1934.

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A Native American Tribe Is Using Traditional Culture To Fight Addiction



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A year and half ago, Gabe Stewart stood in tribal court pleading guilty to felony charges because he stole money from his family to support his opioid addiction. In January, his community honored him for overcoming addiction and watched as his case was dismissed entirely.

Stewart is a member of the Penobscot Nation in Maine, a state hit hard by the opioid crisis. American indigenous communities like his are also some of the hardest hit, with overdose deaths for rural American Indians and Alaska Natives rising by 519 percent between 1999 and 2015, more than double the increase nationally.

When Stewart faced felony charges related to his addiction to Percocet, he was able to benefit from his tribe’s unique approach to addiction. Recognizing that issues with substance abuse in native communities often arise from intergenerational trauma, the Penobscot Nation attempts to reacquaint criminal drug offenders with tribal traditions and cultural practices to help them make a full recovery.

Tribal members who commit substance abuse-related crimes can enter a program called the Healing to Wellness Court, which operates something like a traditional drug court but offers a cultural curriculum.

VICE News followed Stewart on his last day in the Healing to Wellness Court.

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