Great Salt Lake & Salt Lake City, Utah (Desert Empire) ~ 1938 Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad



Views:1511|Rating:4.90|View Time:10:23Minutes|Likes:50|Dislikes:1
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‘Railroad tour through the state of Utah, stopping off at many natural attractions and in Salt Lake City…’ Also covers Great Salt Lake, Ogden, and grain and sheep farming.

Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound.

Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

Wikipedia license:

Salt Lake City, often shortened to Salt Lake or SLC, is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. With an estimated population of 189,314 in 2012, the city lies in the core of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, which has a total population of 1,175,905. Salt Lake City is further situated in a larger urban area known as the Wasatch Front, which has a population of 2,328,299. It is one of only two major urban areas in the Great Basin (the other being Reno, Nevada), and the largest in the Intermountain West.

The city was founded in 1847 by Brigham Young, Isaac Morley, George Washington Bradley and several other Mormon followers, who extensively irrigated and cultivated the arid valley. Due to its proximity to the Great Salt Lake, the city was originally named “Great Salt Lake City”—the word “great” was dropped from the official name in 1868 by the 17th Utah Territorial Legislature. Although Salt Lake City is still home to the headquarters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), less than half the population of Salt Lake City proper are members of the LDS Church today.

Immigration of international LDS members, mining booms, and the construction of the first transcontinental railroad initially brought economic growth, and the city was nicknamed the Crossroads of the West. It was traversed by the Lincoln Highway, the first transcontinental highway, in 1913, and presently two major cross-country freeways, I-15 and I-80, intersect in the city. Salt Lake City has since developed a strong outdoor recreation tourist industry based primarily on skiing, and hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics. It is the industrial banking center of the United States…

The Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad (reporting mark DRGW), often shortened to Rio Grande or D&RGW, formerly the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad, was a U.S. railroad company. The railroad started as a narrow gauge line running south from Denver, Colorado in 1870. It served mainly as a transcontinental bridge line between Denver, and Salt Lake City, Utah. The Rio Grande was also a major origin of coal and mineral traffic.

In 1988, the Rio Grande’s parent corporation, Rio Grande Industries, purchased Southern Pacific Transportation Company, and as the result of a merger, the larger Southern Pacific Railroad name was chosen for identity. Today, most former D&RGW main lines are owned and operated by the Union Pacific Railroad; several branch lines are now operated as heritage railways by various companies.

The Rio Grande was the epitome of mountain railroading, with a motto of Through the Rockies, not around them and later Main line through the Rockies, both referring to the Rocky Mountains. The D&RGW operated the highest mainline rail line in the United States, over the 10,240 feet (3,120 m) Tennessee Pass in Colorado, and the famed routes through the Moffat Tunnel and the Royal Gorge. At its height, around 1890, the D&RG had the largest operating narrow gauge railroad network in North America. Known for its independence, the D&RGW operated the last private intercity passenger train in the United States, the Rio Grande Zephyr.

At the end of 1970 it operated 1,903 miles (3,063 km) of road on 3,227 miles (5,193 km) of track; that year it carried 7733 ton-miles of revenue freight and 21 million passenger-miles…

Ghost Story, Haunted Historic Building, former Church, Movie Theater



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Kingman AZ, March 24, 2012. Do you believe in haunted houses, buildings, hotels, theaters, mines, etc? I went into this business, the Boston Antiques and Collectibles place in downtown Kingman the other day, totally unaware of the stories that it was haunted, so bear with me as I did the report in a bit of an awkward fashion. I was expecting something like this.

According to Dennis the owner, about a year and a half ago a Ghost / Paranormal investigation team came out and spent a night in the place, having documented that the place was haunted. Reportedly 3 ghosts are known to be at the location, a woman, a man (projectionist of the former theater), and a little girl that has been seen with a bag of popcorn.

I did alittle research into the history of the place, actual dates differing according to who’s telling the stories, first having been Lang’s Theater around 1931, Henry Lang the owner at the time. Then around 1939 the place becomes the State Theater which served downtown Kingman Arizona from that time till around the late 1970s. I couldn’t find anything about the place being a church, but Dennis testified that it was at one time.

If you all like these types of stories or investigations, send me a message, and I might be willing to get into this a bit more, as it’s always been a fascination of mine since I was a kid. I saw George4title (g4t) cover a few of these type of stories, and of course many other people have given their personal testimonies of paranormal experiences online, around youtube and such.

Good day everyone, the Mark Allen Channel.

California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada: “Far Western States” 1942 ERPI Classroom Films



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“Resources and growth of the Far West.”

Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound.

Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

Wikipedia license:

California (kæləˈfɔrnjə/) is a state located on the West Coast of the United States. It is the most populous U.S. state, and the third most extensive (after Alaska and Texas). It is home to the nation’s second and sixth largest census statistical areas (Greater Los Angeles area and San Francisco Bay Area, respectively), and eight of the nation’s 50 most populated cities (Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco, Fresno, Sacramento, Long Beach, and Oakland). The capital city is Sacramento.

California’s diverse geography ranges from the Pacific Coast in the west, to the Sierra Nevada mountains in the east — from the Redwood–Douglas-fir forests of the northwest, to the Mojave Desert areas in the southeast. The center of the state is dominated by Central Valley, a major agricultural area. California contains both the highest and lowest points in the contiguous United States (Mount Whitney and Death Valley), and has the 3rd longest coastline of all states (after Alaska and Florida). Earthquakes are a common occurrence due to the state’s location along the Pacific Ring of Fire: about 37,000 are recorded annually…

Oregon (ɔrɨɡən/ ORR-ə-gən) is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. It is located on the Pacific coast, with Washington to the north, California to the south, Nevada on the southeast and Idaho to the east. The Columbia and Snake rivers delineate much of Oregon’s northern and eastern boundaries, respectively. The area was inhabited by many indigenous tribes before the arrival of traders, explorers, and settlers who formed an autonomous government in Oregon Country in 1843. The Oregon Territory was created in 1848, and Oregon became the 33rd state on February 14, 1859…

Washington (wɒʃɪŋtən/) is a state in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States located north of Oregon, west of Idaho and south of the Canadian province of British Columbia, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean. Washington was carved out of the western part of Washington Territory which had been ceded by Britain in 1846 by the Oregon Treaty as settlement of the Oregon Boundary Dispute. It was admitted to the Union as the 42nd state in 1889…

Nevada (nəˈvædə/) is a state in the western, mountain west, and southwestern regions of the United States. Nevada is the 7th most extensive, the 35th most populous, and the 9th least densely populated of the 50 United States. Over two-thirds of Nevada’s people live in one single county, Clark County, which contains the Las Vegas–Paradise metropolitan area, where the state’s three largest incorporated cities are located. Nevada’s capital is Carson City. Nevada is officially known as the “Silver State” due to the importance of silver to its history and economy. It is also known as the “Battle Born State” because it achieved statehood during the Civil War and the “Sagebrush State” for the native eponymous plant…