MC Hammer – 2 Legit 2 Quit



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From 1991 Album: “Too Legit To Quit”…(Click “show more” for artist info)…

Stanley Kirk Burrell (born March 30, 1962), better known by his stage name MC Hammer (and later simply Hammer), is an American rapper, dancer, entrepreneur, spokesman and occasional actor. He had his greatest commercial success and

popularity from the late 1980s until the mid-1990s. Remembered for a rapid rise to fame, Hammer is known for his hit records (such as “U Can’t Touch This” and “2 Legit 2 Quit”), flamboyant dance movements, choreography and trademark

Hammer pants. Hammer’s superstar-status and entertaining showmanship made him a household name and hip hop icon. He has sold more than 50 million records worldwide.

Burrell became a preacher during the late 1990s with a Christian ministry program on TBN called M.C. Hammer and Friends. Additionally, he starred in a Saturday morning cartoon called Hammerman in 1991 and was executive producer of his

own reality show called Hammertime which aired on the A&E Network during the summer of 2009. Hammer was also a television show host and dance judge on Dance Fever in 2003, was co-creator of a dance website called DanceJam.com, and is a

record label CEO while still performing concerts at music venues and assisting with other social media, ministry and outreach functions. Prior to becoming ordained, Hammer signed with Suge Knight’s Death Row Records by 1995.

A multi-award winner, M.C. Hammer is considered a “forefather/pioneer” and innovator of pop rap (incorporating elements of freestyle music), and is the first hip hop artist to achieve diamond status for an album. Hammer was later

considered a sellout due in part to overexposure as an entertainer (having live instrumentation/bands, choreographed dance routines and an impact on popular culture being regularly referenced on television and in music) and as a result

of being too “commercial” when rap was “hardcore” at one point, then his image later becoming increasingly “gritty” to once again adapt to the ever-changing landscape of rap. Regardless, BET ranked Hammer as the #7 “Best Dancer Of All

Time”. Vibe’s “The Best Rapper Ever Tournament” declared him the 17th favorite of all-time during the first round.

Throughout his career, Hammer has managed his own recording business. As a result, he has created and produced his own acts including Oaktown’s 3.5.7, Common Unity, Special Generation, Analise, One Cause One Effect, Teabag, Dom

Kimberley, Geeman, Pleasure Ellis, B Angie B, Stooge Playaz, Ho Frat Hoo! and Wee Wee, among others. A part of additional record labels, he has associated/collaborated/recorded with VMF, Tupac Shakur, Teddy Riley, Felton Pilate, Tha Dogg

Pound, Whole 9, Deion Sanders, Big Daddy Kane, BeBe & CeCe Winans and Jon Gibson, as well as others. In 1992, Doug E. Fresh was signed to M.C. Hammer’s Bust It Records label. In late 2012, Hammer appeared with PSY at the 40th American

Music Awards and during Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve with Ryan Seacrest performing a mashup of “Gangnam Style” and “Too Legit to Quit” together which was released on iTunes.

Sir Mix-A-Lot – My Hooptie



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This version is the “Still Runnin’ Remix” from the 1990 single.

Anthony Ray (born August 12, 1963), better known by his stage name Sir Mix-a-Lot, is an American rapper and recording producer. He is best known for his hit song “Baby Got Back”. Born and raised in Seattle, Washington, he grew up in Seattle’s Central District and graduated from Roosevelt High School in 1981. Early on, Sir Mix-A-Lot had an ear and a passion for music. Soon after high school he began DJing parties at local community centers. By 1983 Mix-A-Lot had begun playing weekends regularly at the Rainier Vista Boys and Girls Club in South Seattle. Soon he moved locations and started throwing his parties at the Rotary Boys and Girls Club in the Central District. It was there that he met ‘Nasty’ Nes Rodriguez, a local radio DJ and host of Fresh Tracks, the West Coast’s first rap radio show on Seattle station KKFX (KFOX).

Anthony Ray was born on August 12, 1963 in Auburn, Washington. He was a fan of hip hop and started rapping in the early 1980s.

Growing up Ray’s mother worked as an LPN at the King County Jail making 6 or 7 dollars an hour. While living in the Bryant Manor apartments on 19th Ave and East Yesler Way, Anthony Ray started school at Roosevelt High School, near the University District, when the Seattle Public School District was in the throes of what would be a 21-year experiment to integrate the school system. Students were bused from their neighborhoods to schools on the other end of the city. From 1978, when the busing program started, to 1999, when it was shelved, minorities carried the burden of busing, piling onto buses from the South End and the Central Area that were headed for predominantly white schools in the North End.

Ray said he knew that some North End residents didn’t want black kids bused into their neighborhoods. But for him, the experience offered respite from the projects. “I’ve heard things like, ‘Forced integration is not good,’ ‘I want my kid to be able to go to school in our community; that’s why we moved here’ – all those things I totally understand,” he said. “But from my perspective, I didn’t have the luxury of living in a neighborhood where a good school was. We didn’t make that kind of money. So from my perspective, it was the best thing that could have happened to me.” A music teacher at Eckstein Middle School introduced Ray to the possibility of a music career. He went on to stardom, winning a Grammy – as Sir Mix-A-Lot.

Sir Mix-a-Lot and his partner, Nasty Nes, founded the Nastymix record label in 1983. Mix-a-Lot’s first hit, released in 1987, was the single “Posse on Broadway,” whose title referred to Broadway in Seattle’s Capitol Hill district near where he had grown up. The “Godzilla” remix of “Posse on Broadway” contained a sample from David Bowie’s 1975 hit “Fame,” but neither the album version nor the original seven-inch edit, which was used for the video, used the Bowie sample. The song made the Top 100 but quickly disappeared, although it remains popular in the Seattle area for its references to many local landmarks.

Swass, Sir Mix-a-Lot’s debut album, was released in 1988 with two other singles: “Square-Dance Rap” and a hip hop cover of the Black Sabbath song “Iron Man” backed by the band Metal Church. In 1990, the Recording Industry Association of America certified Swass platinum.

Seminar, released in 1989 featured “My Hooptie”, “Beepers”, “Gortex” and “I Got Game”.

In 1991, Sir Mix-A-Lot signed to the Def American label, which also bought the rights to his first two albums, and released his third album Mack Daddy in 1992. The single “Baby Got Back” was a number-one hit that went double platinum and won the 1993 Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance. MTV aired the music video for the song only during evening hours because of what they termed “its sexual nature”.

In 1993, Sir Mix-a-Lot collaborated with Seattle-based grunge group Mudhoney for the song “Freak Momma” on the Judgment Night soundtrack.

In 1994, he released Chief Boot Knocka and the album reached #69 on the Billboard 200 and #28 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Charts. The album featured the hit single “Put ‘Em On The Glass.” “Just Da Pimpin’ in Me” was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance but lost to “Let Me Ride” by Dr. Dre. He eventually went on to appear as the regular host of the short-lived UPN anthology drama series The Watcher.

When his 1996 album, Return of the Bumpasaurus, was only given a low label promotion, leading to lackluster sales, Sir Mix-a-Lot left the American label. During the time off, he worked closely with another group, The Presidents of the United States of America under the group name “Subset” with a combination of rock and rap music, but nothing was ever officially released.