Faux and Old World Decorative Finishes

Faux and Old World Decorative Finishes



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Work done by Charly Medina (CAMO) in the area of San Diego, California,
At this video we are going to see Old World techniques with plasters (venetian plasster) and torn paper, tisue paper, combined with faux effects, etc. every job is always done with sample boards, so that the client can see and enjoy the process.
Carlos Medina (CAMO), Architect / Plastic Artist has been working in the Interior field with decorative finishes such as Original to custom Mural artwork , Faux finishes combining and experimenting with different plasters and Old World Techniques. Original Paintings and Decorative Sculpture has been his passion, serving the San Diego Area since 1996.
Significance of murals
Murals are important in that they bring art into the public sphere. Due to the size, cost, and work involved in creating a mural, muralists must often be commissioned by a sponsor. Often it is the local government or a business, but many murals have been paid for with grants of patronage. For artists, their work gets a wide audience who otherwise might not set foot in an art gallery. A city benefits by the beauty of a work of art. Murals exist where people live and work and they can add to their daily lives.
A mural is art painted directly on a wall, making it a visual component of a building. Throughout history, murals have been created for a spectrum of environments, including caves, churches, state capitals, factories, corporations, schools, libraries, post offices, courthouses, and residences. By nature of the medium, mural painting is typically restricted by several conditions, including scale, orientation, fixed spatial requirements, the purpose of the architectural structure, and the appropriateness of its subject matter for its patron or audience. Unlike an easel painter, the muralist must consider and overcome all or several of these factors in the construction of his or her imagery. Mural painting involves inherent social obligations and formal strategies that extend beyond the scope of a purely personal vision to a broader form of communication that is often rooted in shared social beliefs.

Faux painting or Faux finishing are terms used to describe a wide range of decorative painting techniques. From the French word for “fake”, faux painting began as a form of replicating materials such as marble and wood with paint, but has come to encompass many other decorative finishes for walls and furniture.
Faux finishing has been used for millennia, from cave painting to Ancient Egypt, but what we generally think of as faux finishing in decorative arts began with Plaster and Stucco Finishes inMesopotamia over 5000 years ago.
Faux finishes
Marbleizing or faux marbling is used to make walls and furniture look like real marble. This can be done using either plaster or glaze techniques.
Graining, wood graining, or faux bois (French for “fake wood”) is often used to imitate exotic or hard-to-find wood varieties.
Trompe l’oeil, “trick the eye” in French, is a realistic painting technique often used in murals, and to create architectural details.
Venetian plaster is a smooth and often shiny plaster design that appears textured but is smooth to the touch. Venetian plaster is one of the most popular and traditional plaster decorations.
Color wash is a free-form finish that creates subtle variations of color using multiple hues of glaze blended together with a paint brush.
Strie, from the French word meaning “stripe” or “streak”, is a glazing technique that creates soft thin streaks of color using a paint brush. It is a technique often used to simulate fabrics such as linen and denim.
Rag painting or ragging is a glazing technique using twisted or bunched up rags to create a textural pattern.

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